About

I am a research associate in particle physics at the University of Cambridge. My research focuses on searching for new physics, primarily Supersymmetry, using data collected by the ATLAS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. In addition, I contribute to the ATLAS ITk upgrade project. I am part of the Cambridge ATLAS group.

I have a strong interest in the application of machine learning techniques, which have the potential to assist in discoveries of new fundimental physics. This lead me to take part in the 2019 NASA Frontier Development Lab, where I am now a fellow. The Frontier Development Lab aims to bring together researchers to apply machine learning techniques to some of the toughest problems in the space sciences.

Before coming to Cambridge, I completed my doctorate in particle physics at the University of Oxford under the supervison of Prof. Alan Barr.

Publications

All the links you could want

A self-seeded track trigger for the FCC-hh

A study for a novel design of a tracker for one of the dectors for the future circular collider. Track reconstruction at the future collider will be extrodainarily difficult, given the intense pileup conditions, and yet tracking information will be required at the trigger level in order to deail with the pileup conditions. A triplet of tracking layers is proposed, which has the potential to reconstruct tracks a the trigger level and help aleviate some problems with the intense pileup conditions.

FCC Collaboration
CERN-ACC-2018-0046
[Paper]


Search for new phenomena with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse momentum using large-radius jets and flavour-tagging at ATLAS in 13 TeV pp collisions Link to this paper

A search for new physics with signal regions containing as many as at least 11 high momentum jets, using 36.1/fb of data collected by the ATLAS detector from 2015--2017. This is the most sophisitcated search for supersymmetry in the multijet series.

ATLAS Collaboration
JHEP 12 (2017) 034
[Paper]


Search for new phenomena in final states with large jet multiplicities and missing transverse momentum with ATLAS using sqrt(s)=13 TeV proton–proton collisions Link to this paper

Multijet search A search for new phenomena in events with high jet multiplicity and missing transverse momentum with 3.2/fb of data collected by the ATLAS detector in 2015. This was the first search for Supersymmetry to be published with 13 TeV data from the LHC.

ATLAS Collaboration
Phys. Lett. B. 757 (2016) 334
[Paper]


Summary of the ATLAS experiment’s sensitivity to supersymmetry after LHC Run 1 — interpreted in the phenomenological MSSM Link to this paper

pMSSM study A combination of 22 Run-1 searches for new physics, providing the most comprehensive summary of searches for Supersymmetry. The results were interpreted in the 19-parameter ``phenomenological MSSM'', and the paper was the first of it’s kind from an experimental collaboration.
  • Featured in the CERN courier and on the Resonaances blog
  • Selected as an Oxford Physics highlight, and an ATLAS collaboration highlight
  • The results were used for several spin-off publications: 1605.09502, 1605.02797 1604.02959,
  • See also this parallel coordinates plot I made for fun, as a new way to interpret the results

  • ATLAS Collaboration
    JHEP 10 (2015) 134
    [Paper]


    Pursuit of new phenomena in final states with high jet multiplicity, high jet masses and missing transverse momentum with ATLAS at sqrt(s)=13 TeV Link to this paper

    Multijet CONF An update of the above search for new physics in evets with high jet multiplicity with 18.2\fb of data. This time, jet substructure techniques were used to enhance the sensitivity of the search.

    ATLAS Collaboration
    ATLAS-CONF-2016-095 ,Geneva, CERN
    [Note]


    Want more?

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